Shavei Israel | Russia

Russia Tag

The beginning of the 2018 school year was accompanied by a joyful event for the Subbotnik community of Vysoki, Russia: after a long break, the Sunday school re-opened its doors for the local children to formally learn Torah and Jewish tradition....

It's no wonder that more and more people of different ages, interests and backgrounds are enthusiastically joining our projects, making their own huge contribution to the meaningful work of returning and bringing Jews closer to their national, religious and cultural heritage....

Today, when Jewish communities all over the world are celebrating the miracle of Chanukah, we are glad to share with you some new pictures that we received from the Subbotnik communities of Vysoki, Russia, and Beit Shemesh, Israel....

Tuesday, August 22 is a date that Tamara Sobyleva will never forget. That’s the day she received her teudat zehut – her Israeli identification card – ending a decade-long process that has been both joyous and bittersweet for the 57-year-old former resident of Vysoki, Russia....

It’s back! By popular demand, Shavei Israel is once again producing a beautiful Jewish calendar chock full of photos from the lost and “hidden” communities with whom we work. You’ll learn more about our communities in China, Colombia, India, Poland, Spain, Portugal, Russia, El Salvador,...

In 1827, Czar Nicholas I of Russia published a harsh “Recruitment Decree” which required the 25-year conscription of Jewish boys between the ages of 12 and 25. These children were taken away from their families and became known as cantonists, and for the next 29...

Karate Judaism is a Jewish movement that recognizes only the Bible as a source for legal authority. Tracing its origins to Baghdad in the 8th century CE, today, there only are an estimated 30,000–50,000 Karaites left, most living in Israel, with smaller communities in Turkey,...

[caption id="attachment_6350" align="alignleft" width="289"] Bukharan Jews in 1890[/caption] The term “Bukharan Jews” refers to the Central Asian Jews of the political entity of Bukhara, those of Samarkand, and the Ferghana Valley. Today, the region is divided between the former Soviet republics of Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Kyrgyzstan...